What is CONSCIOUS SEDATION?

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What is CONSCIOUS SEDATION?

Conscious sedation or nitrous oxide can help patients relax during dental work. Patients are awake but usually are not able to feel or remember their dental visit. Conscious sedation might be suitable for patients with:

  • a low pain threshold
  • trouble sitting still in the dentist’s chair
  • very sensitive teeth
  • pronounced gag reflex
  • a significant amount of treatment required

IS SEDATION DENTISTRY SAFE FOR ME?

Prior to your procedure, we will review your medical history thoroughly to determine if sedation is a safe option. During treatment, we also monitor our sedated patients very closely to ensure their safety.

WILL I BE COMPLETELY RELAXED WITH SEDATION DENTISTRY?

You will receive just enough sedation to be completely unaware of the treatment, as if you were asleep.

WILL I REMEMBER ANYTHING?

If you undergo treatment with sedation dentistry, you will leave our practice with little or no memory of your visit.

WILL I FEEL ANY PAIN?

Most patients feel no discomfort whatsoever during their treatment and feel surprisingly good after receiving sedation dentistry at our practice.

WILL I BE GROGGY AFTER MY TREATMENT IS OVER?

You will feel just fine. For your safety, we do require that you have a family member or friend drive you home after treatment. Generally, the effects of sedation dentistry are minimal.

Posted By:
Dr.Douglas T. Hanson
Dr. Douglas Hanson is a Greater City of Sudbury area Dentist driven by lifelong learning, advanced technologies, and online marketing. In addition to the obvious, Dr.Hanson has lectured and presented to audiences on topics such as; leadership from within, temporal mandibular disorders, implant dentistry, obstructive sleep apnea and most recently on world class customer service. Writing about some of these topics on social media and online has provided a new avenue for Dr.Hanson to share his passion for both dental subject matter, as well as leadership and personal awareness and enhancement. Check out his Twitter and Facebook feeds and allow Dr. Doug to share his passion!

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What are dental implants?

If one or more of your teeth are missing, there are a number of ways to replace them. Dental implants are an alternative to bridges, partials, or complete dentures. They replace missing roots and support artificial replacement teeth. They are comfortable and look like natural teeth.

What are dental implants?

A dental implant is an artificial root made of titanium metal. The dentist inserts it into the jawbone to replace the root of the natural tooth. An artificial replacement tooth attaches to the implant. The implant acts as an anchor to hold the replacement tooth in place.

Who can get dental implants?

If you are in good general health, have healthy gums and have enough bone in the jaw to hold an implant, dental implants might be right for you. If your jawbone has shrunk or if it has not developed normally, you may be able to have a bone graft to build up the bone. A bone graft is a way of adding new bone to your jawbone. Dr. Hanson will tell you if you are eligible for bone grafting.

What is the dental implant procedure like?

  • Dr. Hanson will carefully examine your mouth and take x-rays of your head, jaw, and teeth to find out if dental implants are right for you.
  • During the first stage of surgery, Dr. Hanson will put a dental implant into your jawbone beneath the gum tissue and then stitch it back into place. As the tissue heals, the implant will bond with the bone and attach to the gum. It can take several months to heal.
  • During the second stage of surgery after tissue heals, Dr. Hanson will attach an abutment to the implant. An abutment is a post that connects the replacement tooth to the implant. In some cases, the first and second stage of implant surgery may be done in one single stage.
  • Dr. Hanson attaches an artificial replacement tooth to the abutment. It may take several appointments for the replacement tooth to fit properly.
  • When replacing several teeth or all of your teeth, a fixed bridge is anchored to your dental implants. A bridge is a dental restoration that replaces one or more missing teeth by spanning an area that has no teeth.

New You DentureTM

Traditional or conventional dentures have continued to decline in quality by succumbing to market demands for low costs and mass production. The problem is that no two mouths are alike and one-size-fits-all has actually become one size fits nobody.

Dr. Hanson is committed to using a denture system designed specifically for each patient’s unique needs. By combining aesthetic training with advanced denture building techniques and technologies, Dr. Hanson can often achieve dramatic results not possible with conventional dentures.

The Benefits of New You DentureTM

As you lose teeth, the unsupported jawbone begins to shrink. As much as 50% to 75% can be lost forever. The result is the dreaded sunken in look that identifies denture wearers.

Conventional dentures do not replace the original contours of the face that we associate with youth and health; full lips, strong profile, filled out lower facial features.

New You DentureTM is different. They use your existing jawbone as the bedrock for a cantilevered denture. They are hand crafted to return your profile as close as possible to its original proportions, conveying youth, health, and a confident and beautiful smile.

New You DentureTM is the solution for you if you want:

  • A more attractive, natural smile
  • A neuromuscular/cosmetic approach to denture building and treatment that will allow you to maintain optimum muscle relaxation, bite and function that translates directly into the appearance of your dentures
  • Great facial support that eliminates the sunken-in look
  • To look better and feel better – some patients look 20 years younger!

 

 

 

Posted By:
Dr.Douglas T. Hanson
Dr. Douglas Hanson is a Greater City of Sudbury area Dentist driven by lifelong learning, advanced technologies, and online marketing. In addition to the obvious, Dr.Hanson has lectured and presented to audiences on topics such as; leadership from within, temporal mandibular disorders, implant dentistry, obstructive sleep apnea and most recently on world class customer service. Writing about some of these topics on social media and online has provided a new avenue for Dr.Hanson to share his passion for both dental subject matter, as well as leadership and personal awareness and enhancement. Check out his Twitter and Facebook feeds and allow Dr. Doug to share his passion!

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Why is my jaw popping?

Do you experience clicking, cracking and popping when your jaw opens or closes? Sometimes we all experience temporary jaw sounds. “Crepitus” is the medical term for any clicking, popping or grinding sound that emanates from a joint and, in many cases, it is the result from pressure causing movement and a release of nitrogen gas and bursting joint fluid.  Again, any of these symptoms can be one-time experiences or temporary annoyances.

However, in other cases these sounds can be a symptom of an underlying, more severe issue in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This article will cover the differences between jaw popping that may be associated with TMJD and normal joint functions.

Jaw Popping

In a fascinating study published by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, scientists actually recorded the jaws of their patients. In the study, three dentists listened to and classified the sound recordings as 1) no sound, 2) click, 3) coarse crepitus and 4) fine crepitus. The sounds were recorded with microphones in the ear canal from 126 subjects during vertical opening. The recordings were then digitized and replayed using a computer sound card and speakers.

The dentists found that the sounds made by the jaws of patients with TMJ Disorders were “significantly different” than the sounds made by those without the condition.

Further, studies by dentist/author Rickne Scheid showed that over one-third of his students had some sort of signs of the sound in one side of their jaws. This means that not every case of jaw popping and jaw noise points to a TMJ Disorder.  However, jaw noises can be a sign that there could be degeneration to the articular disc or a structural issue with the TMJ that could lead to a disorder in the future.

How Do I know if My Jaw Popping is a Sign of a TMJ Disorder?

If your jaw is popping or making noises, is it also coupled with any of the following symptoms?

  1. Pain: If your jaw pops and the experience is also painful, you may have more going on than a temporary symptom.
  2. If your jaw locks in place when it pops open or closed, you should definitely seek a professional opinion on your condition. (Find a qualified physiologic dentist on LVI global website)
  3. Consistent occurrence: Does the popping happen frequently and often during the same types of activities (such as yawning or chewing)? The consistency of the experience may point to a larger jaw issue.

Why Do Jaws Pop?

The temporomandibular joints are the points at which the lower jaw (the mandible) attaches to the skull.

They are among the most complex joints in the human anatomy. If you place your fingers on the sides of your face, just in front of your ears, and open and close your mouth, you can feel the movement of the mandible in the temporomandibular joints.That is often where jaw popping and noises originate, caused by one of the following:

  • The head of the mandible causing pressure on the articular disc and causes the sounds.
  • The joint capsule is pressured causing a popping.
  • The cartilage in the TMJ has worn down and is causing a grinding noise.

What Should I do if My Jaw Pops?

If you are experiencing popping or a locked jaw, you should see a neuromuscular dentist. He or she will use one of the following techniques to diagnose your condition.

  • CT or CAT Scans can provide detail on the bones in the joint and surrounding areas, the sinuses, and the brain.
  • MRI shows the soft tissues including the disc and muscles.  MRIs can also be taken with the mouth open and closed to show positioning of the disc and muscles in relation to the joints.
  • Tomography is a type of x-ray that shows cross sections of the jaw area.
  • Other routine dental x-rays can be used to diagnose TMJ disorder that provide views of the head, joint, teeth, surrounding bones and structures.

What are the Treatments for Jaw Popping?

The neuromuscular dentist may provide you with one of the following treatment regimens, depending on the severity of your condition:

Medications

  • Pain relievers
  • Tricyclic antidepressants, also used for pain relief.
  • Muscle relaxants
  • Sedatives

Therapies

  • Bite guards (oral splints)
  • Physical therapy
  • Counseling

Surgical or other procedures

  • Arthrocentesis. This procedure involves the insertion of needles into the joint so that fluid can be irrigated through the joint to remove debris and inflammatory byproducts.
  • Injections, such as corticosteroids
  • Surgery

Jaw popping may be related to a bigger issue with your jaw joints. In order to be sure, seek the advice of a neuromuscular dentist.

Posted By:
Dr.Douglas T. Hanson
Dr. Douglas Hanson is a Greater City of Sudbury area Dentist driven by lifelong learning, advanced technologies, and online marketing. In addition to the obvious, Dr.Hanson has lectured and presented to audiences on topics such as; leadership from within, temporal mandibular disorders, implant dentistry, obstructive sleep apnea and most recently on world class customer service. Writing about some of these topics on social media and online has provided a new avenue for Dr.Hanson to share his passion for both dental subject matter, as well as leadership and personal awareness and enhancement. Check out his Twitter and Facebook feeds and allow Dr. Doug to share his passion!

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6 Home Remedies for TMJ Symptoms

Temporomandibular joint dysfunction, better known as TMJ or TMD, can flare up at any time, and sometimes for no apparent reason. If you’re suffering from TMJ, you know it’s no laughing matter when it does. Check out these tips to relieve TMJ-related pain on your own at home, or to find temporary relief before you can meet with a dentist trained to treat jaw joint disorders.

    1. Moist heat – Try wrapping a hot water bottle in a warm, moist towel. This moist heat therapy can relieve pain and improve the function of your jaw. Just be sure to keep it at a comfortable temperature—not too hot.ice pack for tmj
    2. Ice – Along with the moist heat, you can try an ice pack, again wrapped in a towel, only this time, make it a dry one. Alternating warm and cold can relieve inflammation, as well as numb the pain. Apply the heat for 15 to 20 minutes. Then, switch to the ice for 5 to 10 minutes. Then, back to the heat again.
    3. Ibuprofen or acetaminophen – Don’t discount the benefits of a good non-prescription pain reliever. Ibuprofen has the added benefit of alleviating inflammation, too, making it one of the better home remedies for TMJ symptoms.
    4. TMJ Diet – When your jaw is just so sore or uncooperative that eating becomes a problem, switch your menu to soft or drinkable foods. Try fruit and yogurt smoothies you can slurp through a straw, or soup you can sip from a mug. Avoid crunchy, chewy, or hard foods, and don’t suffer through “big bite” foods like corn on the cob, sandwiches, apples or other whole fruits, and salads.
    5. Stress relief – Stress is one of the biggest contributors to TMJ flare-ups. Whether it’s a soothing bath, a massage, a meditation session, or just a nice curl-up with a good book and a cup of tea, do what you have to do to bring your stress level down. One of the best home remedies for TMJ is simply taking care of yourself. Keeping your stress level down may not always be the easiest thing to do, depending on your lifestyle, but you have to do whatever you can, or you’ll pay for it in the long run with days and nights of TMJ pain.
    6. New habits – Becoming aware of the things you do that might be exacerbating your TMJ may be one of the best home remedies you can ever apply.
      • Do you clench your teeth or bite the inside of your jaw while working or reading?
      • Are you guilty of cradling the phone to hold the handset?
      • How about hunching over at your desk, or resting your head in your hands?
      • Sleep on your stomach or back?

Any and all of these habits can cause TMJ problems. Become aware of the things you do that might be adding to your misery, and eliminate them. If you’re a jaw clencher or cheek biter, try holding a soft wine cork in your teeth. Invest in a headset for your phone. Sit up straight and focus on maintained posture. Sleep on your side, supporting your neck and shoulder with a pillow. Teach your poor tired jaw new tricks, and the number of TMJ flare ups just may decrease.

TMJ is no fun at all, and you should see an LVI physiologic dentist for persistent problems. By keeping these tips in your back pocket, though, you’ll be able to find temporary TMJ relief on your own.

Sincerely Dr Douglas Hanson LVIF

Posted By:
Dr.Douglas T. Hanson
Dr. Douglas Hanson is a Greater City of Sudbury area Dentist driven by lifelong learning, advanced technologies, and online marketing. In addition to the obvious, Dr.Hanson has lectured and presented to audiences on topics such as; leadership from within, temporal mandibular disorders, implant dentistry, obstructive sleep apnea and most recently on world class customer service. Writing about some of these topics on social media and online has provided a new avenue for Dr.Hanson to share his passion for both dental subject matter, as well as leadership and personal awareness and enhancement. Check out his Twitter and Facebook feeds and allow Dr. Doug to share his passion!

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Proud Sponsor of the 42nd Annual Valley East Days Festival!

On behalf of my associates Dr. Jeffrey Treleaven, Dr. Melissa Bahl & our dedicated staff at Hanson Dentistry we welcome you and your family to the 42nd annual  Valley East Days, the largest free family festival in Ontario!
We hope to see you there!
For more info visit:
Posted By:
Dr.Douglas T. Hanson
Dr. Douglas Hanson is a Greater City of Sudbury area Dentist driven by lifelong learning, advanced technologies, and online marketing. In addition to the obvious, Dr.Hanson has lectured and presented to audiences on topics such as; leadership from within, temporal mandibular disorders, implant dentistry, obstructive sleep apnea and most recently on world class customer service. Writing about some of these topics on social media and online has provided a new avenue for Dr.Hanson to share his passion for both dental subject matter, as well as leadership and personal awareness and enhancement. Check out his Twitter and Facebook feeds and allow Dr. Doug to share his passion!

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Common questions about cosmetic dentistry

Does bleaching damage the teeth?

No. When carbamide peroxide, the active whitening agent, contacts water, hydrogen peroxide is released which whitens the teeth. Bleaching does not soften, demineralize or weaken the teeth.

Do over-the-counter bleaching products work?

There is some evidence that over-the-counter bleaching products do whiten teeth, however, many of the products are too abrasive and can damage the teeth with extended use or misuse. Supervision by your dentist is always the safest and most effective way to whiten your teeth.

What are porcelain veneers and why are they used?

Porcelain veneers are ultra-thin shells of ceramic material which are bonded to the front of the teeth. This procedure can be an ideal choice for improving the appearance of the front teeth by masking discolorations, whitening teeth and/or reshaping a smile.

Posted By:
Dr.Douglas T. Hanson
Dr. Douglas Hanson is a Greater City of Sudbury area Dentist driven by lifelong learning, advanced technologies, and online marketing. In addition to the obvious, Dr.Hanson has lectured and presented to audiences on topics such as; leadership from within, temporal mandibular disorders, implant dentistry, obstructive sleep apnea and most recently on world class customer service. Writing about some of these topics on social media and online has provided a new avenue for Dr.Hanson to share his passion for both dental subject matter, as well as leadership and personal awareness and enhancement. Check out his Twitter and Facebook feeds and allow Dr. Doug to share his passion!

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Does your dentist know what’s in your medicine cabinet?

If you use over-the-counter or prescription medications, it’s important to let your dentist know. You should also mention any side effects you’ve experienced as these can negatively affect oral health and even lead to more serious conditions. Luckily, early dentist detection can help reduce or alleviate many of these problems.

Dry mouth

Dry mouth (also called xerostomia) is a side effect of many medications. Although discomfort may be minimal, decreased saliva can cause bacteria and plaque to accumulate in your mouth, making you more susceptible to gum disease and tooth decay. Help combat dry mouth by drinking plenty of water (six to eight 8-ounce glasses per day), and talk to your dentist about alleviating symptoms.

Gingival enlargement

Some medications – including the calcium channel blockers frequently prescribed to control high blood pressure – can cause gingival enlargement, a condition that causes gums to swell and begin to grow over the teeth. If left untreated, it can cause severe periodontal (gum) infection. Luckily, early detection and dentist monitoring can help reduce its negative effects.

Tooth decay

From cough drops to antacid tablets, many medications in a dissolvable tablet or liquid form are sweetened to make them more palatable. The downside is that these sugars can leave a sticky residue on teeth, making them more susceptible to decay. If you think your medication may be sweetened, be sure to brush your teeth after each dose.

Other side effects

There are many other medication side effects that can affect your oral health. Oral contraceptives and blood pressure control pills have been linked to oral sores and inflammation. Tetracycline, used for acne treatment, can discolor teeth and underlying bone. A number of over-the-counter remedies, from antibiotics to ibuprofen, can produce lesions or ulcers in the mouth.

Nervous system medications

Drugs affecting the central nervous system can negatively impact oral health. Side effects like fatigue, lethargy and motor impairment may make brushing and flossing difficult. Adults taking antidepressants and high blood pressure medications can have elevated levels of plaque and the clinical signs of gingivitis.

Source: Academy Of General Dentistry

Posted By:
Dr.Douglas T. Hanson
Dr. Douglas Hanson is a Greater City of Sudbury area Dentist driven by lifelong learning, advanced technologies, and online marketing. In addition to the obvious, Dr.Hanson has lectured and presented to audiences on topics such as; leadership from within, temporal mandibular disorders, implant dentistry, obstructive sleep apnea and most recently on world class customer service. Writing about some of these topics on social media and online has provided a new avenue for Dr.Hanson to share his passion for both dental subject matter, as well as leadership and personal awareness and enhancement. Check out his Twitter and Facebook feeds and allow Dr. Doug to share his passion!

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4 tips for braces care

Having braces is no excuse to slack on dental hygiene! Follow these tips and tricks to keep your teeth and gums healthy during your orthodontic treatment.

1. Brush carefully

Don’t let food get trapped in your braces. Use a soft- bristled brush to remove debris from your teeth, brackets, and wires. If your current toothbrush isn’t doing the job, consider getting an orthodontic toothbrush. With V-shaped bristles, these toothbrushes are designed to fit around braces.

2. Brush in between your brackets

Use an interdental toothbrush to clean the spaces between the metal and your teeth.

3. Don’t forget to floss

Floss under the wires of your braces.

Flossing every day is especially important when you’ve got braces. Having trouble getting the floss under the wires? Just use a floss threader with regular floss, or buy special stiff-tipped floss made for braces wearers.

4. Stay on top of your appointments

Make sure to visit your orthodontist for regular follow-ups. You’ll also want to make appointments with your regular dentist for cleanings and exams. Some dentists will ask your orthodontist to remove the wires before a cleaning, while others will clean around them.

Posted By:
Dr.Douglas T. Hanson
Dr. Douglas Hanson is a Greater City of Sudbury area Dentist driven by lifelong learning, advanced technologies, and online marketing. In addition to the obvious, Dr.Hanson has lectured and presented to audiences on topics such as; leadership from within, temporal mandibular disorders, implant dentistry, obstructive sleep apnea and most recently on world class customer service. Writing about some of these topics on social media and online has provided a new avenue for Dr.Hanson to share his passion for both dental subject matter, as well as leadership and personal awareness and enhancement. Check out his Twitter and Facebook feeds and allow Dr. Doug to share his passion!

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Are you allergic to your dentist?

Allergies to watch out for

As you wait for your next dental exam, you probably have a list of things you’d like to discuss — whether you have any cavities, which mouthwash you should use or how much your insurance will cover. But here’s one important topic that probably doesn’t make your list: allergies.

Though common allergies like hayfever won’t affect your visit, certain contact allergies can cause problems. Allergic reactions to latex, anesthesia or even certain metals — which may be used in fillings, retainers or partial dentures — are all important to mention.

If you do have an allergy to anesthesia or another substance used in dental work, don’t worry. Safe alternatives are available, and your dentist will be able to discuss these options with you, such as using neoprene or nitrile gloves instead of traditional latex.

Make sure to call your dental office at least 24 hours before your appointment to inform them of your allergy. This is particularly important for latex allergies, since everything from gloves, rubber dams and x-ray bite tabs can contain latex. Giving the office prior notice will help ensure that your experience is allergy-free.

Even if you don’t think your particular allergy is cause for concern, it’s always worth a quick discussion with your dentist. And, as always, don’t forget to mention any other health-related information during your appointment, such as pregnancy, diabetes or osteoporosis.

Source: Academy Of General Dentistry

 

Posted By:
Dr.Douglas T. Hanson
Dr. Douglas Hanson is a Greater City of Sudbury area Dentist driven by lifelong learning, advanced technologies, and online marketing. In addition to the obvious, Dr.Hanson has lectured and presented to audiences on topics such as; leadership from within, temporal mandibular disorders, implant dentistry, obstructive sleep apnea and most recently on world class customer service. Writing about some of these topics on social media and online has provided a new avenue for Dr.Hanson to share his passion for both dental subject matter, as well as leadership and personal awareness and enhancement. Check out his Twitter and Facebook feeds and allow Dr. Doug to share his passion!

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It’s Little Things that Make a Big Difference

Sometimes an inspiring story helps us find out the strength within us.

An inspiring story helps you inspire yourself and motivate yourself. It also helps find out what you can do and what you cannot. There are hundreds you may have read in your life. But how many of them actually made changes in your mind is a question.

Here are some inspiring short stories that not only gives a powerful lesson but can also be helpful to learn about some unknown truths about life.

There was a man taking a morning walk at or the beach. He saw that along with the morning tide came hundreds of starfish and when the tide receded, they were left behind and with the morning sun rays, they would die. The tide was fresh and the starfish were alive.

The man took a few steps, picked one and threw it into the water. He did that repeatedly.

Right behind him there was another person who couldn’t understand what this man was doing. He caught up with him and asked, “What are you doing? There are hundreds of starfish. How many can you help? What difference does it make?” This man did not reply, took two more steps, picked up another one, threw it into the water, and said, “It makes a difference to this one.”

What difference are we making? Big or small, it does not matter. If everyone made a small difference, we’d end up with a big difference, wouldn’t we?

Try not to miss the small opportunities to make a positive difference, your action could be the beginning of something fantastic.

Posted By:
Dr.Douglas T. Hanson
Dr. Douglas Hanson is a Greater City of Sudbury area Dentist driven by lifelong learning, advanced technologies, and online marketing. In addition to the obvious, Dr.Hanson has lectured and presented to audiences on topics such as; leadership from within, temporal mandibular disorders, implant dentistry, obstructive sleep apnea and most recently on world class customer service. Writing about some of these topics on social media and online has provided a new avenue for Dr.Hanson to share his passion for both dental subject matter, as well as leadership and personal awareness and enhancement. Check out his Twitter and Facebook feeds and allow Dr. Doug to share his passion!

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